National Brain Tumor Awareness Month

May is National Brain Tumor Awareness Month.  Driven by advancement in research, surgical techniques, genetic discoveries, and much more, it has never been a better time to take action on brain tumors.

The National Brain Tumor Society (NBTS), an organization whose mission is to unrelentingly invest in, mobilize, and unite our community to discover a cure, deliver effective treatments, and advocate for brain tumor patients and care partners, estimates that 700,000 people in the United States are living with a primary brain tumor and over 87,000 more will be diagnosed in 2020.

A brain tumor is an abnormal growth of tissue in the brain or central spine that can disrupt proper brain function.  Doctors refer to a tumor based on where the tumor cells originated, and whether they are cancerous (malignant) or not (benign).  Brain tumors can be deadly, significantly impact the quality of life, and change everything for a patient and their loved ones.  They do not discriminate, inflicting men, women, and children of all races and ethnicities.

Below are some quick Brain Tumor Facts from the NBTS:

– Of the estimated 700,000 Americans are living with a brain tumor:

69.8% of tumors are benign

30.2% of tumors are malignant

– Of the estimated 87,240 people that will receive a primary brain tumor diagnosis in 2020:

61,430 will be benign

25,800 will be malignant

– There are more than 130 different types of brain tumors, many with their own multitude of subtypes.

– The most prevalent brain tumor types in adults are Meningiomas, which make up 53.3% of all non-malignant tumors, and Glioblastomas, which make up 48.3% of all malignant tumors.

At Columbus CyberKnife, we treat brain tumors with the CyberKnife® Robotic Radiosurgery System.  CyberKnife painlessly delivers precise beams of high-dose radiation to brain tumors and lesions, without incisions, hospitalization, or long recovery time.  CyberKnife is a non-invasive alternative to brain cancer surgery and can be used for brain tumors that are considered inoperable because of their location in the head, for those patients who cannot undergo brain cancer surgery due to their poor medical condition, or who refuse surgery.

More than any other cancer, brain tumors can have lasting and life-altering physical, cognitive, and psychological impacts on a patient’s life.  The physicians and clinical teams at Columbus CyberKnife are here to help.  For more information about brain tumors and how we treat them with CyberKnife technology, please contact us today.

Research Shows Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors Improves Survival Rates for Patients Under 50

In a recent study published in the journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), researchers demonstrated the efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of brain metastases, or tumors that have spread from a primary tumor in another area of the body to the brain.

The study examined the survival rates of patients age 50 and younger who received only SRS in comparison to patients of the same age group who received both SRS and whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Researchers determined that the survival rate was improved by 13 percent for patients who received SRS alone, when compared to the other group. To read more details from the study, click here.

Columbus CyberKnife uses advanced CyberKnife® technology to treat brain metastases with SRS. CyberKnife treats tumors in the brain with highly focused radiation, while sparing healthy surrounding tissue. CyberKnife SRS offers brain tumor patients an aggressive treatment option with minimal disruption to normal activities. Typically, patients experience few to no side effects from treatment, which does not require surgery or sedation.

To find out if you or a loved one could be a candidate for CyberKnife treatment, contact our center.

This is not intended as medical advice to replace the expertise and judgment of your health care team. It is intended to help you and your family make informed decisions, together with your doctor.

Brain Tumor Awareness Month: Treatment Options for Recurrent Tumors

Each May, communities come together to honor Brain Tumor Awareness Month by spotlighting those impacted by a brain tumor diagnosis and the need for greater understanding of the disease and its treatment options.

Columbus CyberKnife is joining the efforts to increase understanding for one specific case – recurrent brain tumors. Recurrent brain tumors occur when a tumor grows back in the same area of the brain. In these cases, patients may be presented with treatment options including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

Patients with recurrent brain tumors may find they are unable or unwilling to undergo certain treatments for the second time, given the brain is one of the most vital organs and additional treatment could impact cognitive function. In cases where patients have limited options, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) may be an option.

Our center delivers SRS using the CyberKnife® system, an advanced technology that has particular advantages for treating areas of the body that have been previously treated with surgery or radiation.

For example, a patient with a recurrent brain tumor who previously received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) potentially has limited options as large margins of normal brain tissue are exposed to radiation during WBRT. Further treatment may result in cognitive and functional decline. However, CyberKnife radiosurgery may be an option even after previous WBRT treatment. CyberKnife has the ability to pinpoint precise locations in the brain and deliver targeted doses of radiation with extreme accuracy. This minimizes exposure to surrounding healthy tissue and may reduce overall side effects of retreatment.

To learn more about retreatment with CyberKnife, contact our center or read our blog post on how CyberKnife can help when cancer comes back.

This is not intended as medical advice to replace the expertise and judgment of your health care team. It is intended to help you and your family make informed decisions, together with your doctor.

Clinical Study: Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) can be an effective treatment for brain metastases, which are tumors that develop in the brain from cancer cells that have spread from another area in the body.

Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle released data that indicated a potential for improved survival rates for patients with brain metastases who receive stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The study, which compared SRS to whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in 413 patients who were diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer and with fewer than four brain metastases found that those treated with SRS had an overall survival of nine months compared to 3.9 months for patients treated with WBRT. These findings suggest that improved survival rates could be among the benefits that SRS offers to patients diagnosed with the disease.

Contact us to learn more about stereotactic radiosurgery for primary and metastatic brain tumors. We treat brain tumors using CyberKnife® technology, which delivers pinpoint high-dose radiation to tumors in five or fewer outpatient treatments.

This is not intended as medical advice to replace the expertise and judgment of your health care team. It is intended to help you and your family make informed decisions, together with your doctor.

Benefits of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors

Data released by researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle showed a potential for improved survival rates for patients with brain metastases who receive stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS).

The study compared SRS to whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in 413 patients who were diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer and had fewer than four brain metastases. Researchers found that those treated with SRS had an overall survival of nine months compared to 3.9 months for patients treated with WBRT. These findings suggest that improved survival rates could be among the benefits that SRS offers to patients diagnosed with the disease.

At Columbus CyberKnife, we treat brain tumors using CyberKnife SRS, which delivers pinpoint high-dose radiation to tumors in five or fewer outpatient treatments. To learn more about stereotactic radiosurgery for primary and metastatic brain tumors, please contact us.

This is not intended as medical advice to replace the expertise and judgment of your health care team. It is intended to help you and your family make informed decisions, together with your doctor.

Spotlight on: Brain Tumors

According to the American Cancer Society, brain tumors account for one in every 100 cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. CyberKnife® stereotactic radiosurgery is an advanced treatment option for brain tumors, providing an important nonsurgical alternative for patients. Below is a brief overview of brain tumors, incidence rates and treatment options.

 

BrainCancerInfographic
 

The information provided about medical conditions, treatment options, comparisons and associated risks is a very brief overview. Consult your doctor for any diagnosis and its best treatment.

Columbus CyberKnife focuses on education during Brain Tumor Awareness Month

May marks the recognition of National Brain Tumor Awareness Month. Since its establishment in 2008, community organizations and support groups celebrate this month with increased efforts to raise awareness of brain tumors, increase funding for research and educate the public on symptoms and treatment options.

The Central Brain Tumor Registry estimates 66,290 new cases of primary non-malignant and malignant brain and central nervous system tumors will be diagnosed in the United States in 2012. What patients may not know is that a large percentage of those diagnoses will be from metastatic tumors, tumors that develop from cancer cells that have spread from another part of the body.

There are more than 120 different types of brain tumors, and while not all are necessarily fatal, any brain tumor should be considered a serious health condition. Brain tumors often create increased pressure in the skull, known as intracranial hypertension. This can lead to, among other conditions, headaches, vomiting, vision problems and altered states of consciousness.

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